The Mother of All Jobs:  How to Have Children and a Career and Stay Sane(ish)

Big Jobs, Small Children (Bloomsbury India, Price Rs 599) is a funny, heart-breaking and completely realistic take on why combining a big job and small children breaks you, why everyone lies about it but ultimately how you can be happy if you extract the knowledge others learnt the hard way.

When Christine Armstrong became a mother, it never occurred to her that she would want to stop work or even work part-time. But the truth is, combining big jobs and small kids is hard.

From the broken breast pumps on business trips, to hiding chickenpox from the nursery, to the heartbreak when you come home and realise your baby smells of the childminder. When Christine Armstrong tried it, she found herself desolate with misery. Determined to make it work, she looked for answers by interviewing other working mums and found that she wasn’ t alone. These are the  stories of the women who shared everything (and we mean, everything) and what they want you to know.

Big Jobs, Small Children is a funny, heart-breaking and completely realistic take on why combining a big job and small children breaks you, why everyone lies about it but ultimately how you can be happy if you extract the knowledge others learnt the hard way.

A book you will wish someone had given you the day you became a parent. Read it and pass it on…

Women want to read stories from real women in the workplace and know.  They’re not the only ones  limping through a work day  hoping the nursery won’t call. Explores the tension between our desire for more senior women and the real costs of working motherhood. Tapping into the anti­‘having  it all’ market.

The book covers the full parenting spectrum from family planning all the way through to the teenage years Includes key chapters on single parenting, dads and what is needed from the modern workplace to support modern families.

Christine Armstrong is Contributing Editor of Management Today, co-founder of communications consultancy Jericho Chambers and Chair of the Maternity Liaison Committee at University College London Hospital. She has spent four years interviewing women with big jobs and small children. She has three daughters under  eight, is  against her own advice – an  active member of the school  PTA and recently introduced plastic fishing to  London’s docklands.

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